First impressions of Android

I’ve had my new HTC Wildfire S for a few days now. So how does Android compare to iOS (I’ve got an iPad and iPod Touch)?

The Phone

The phone is definitely at the “entry level” end of the market, but the camera is usable, the screen sometimes correctly detects where I’ve poked my finger and is quite bright. The battery life is dire, it’s brand new and hardly makes it through the day – I would guess this is a combination of Android’s architecture and the phone itself, but who really knows. The build quality isn’t great – I’ve already got a tiny chip out of the casing from just leaving it in my bag, and there’s barely a mark on my two year old iPod Touch.

The winning quality is really the price. On Talk Mobile, I get 1Gb of data 200 mins, 200 txts for 12 quid: stunning. That’s just £288 which can’t be much more than the phone cost to produce.

Android

I’m a big fan of iOS, but I’m not a real fanboy of any platform – I use Windows, OS-X and Linux, and like them all. In the premiership, I want all the teams to win – at least until Saints get back into the league. I’ve voted for most of the main political parties and will probably complete a full house next time around. So where Android lacks the fancy animations of iOS and doesn’t feel as squidgey, it takes a more holistic approach. Thus, when it finds two contacts with the same name, it asks you to associate them. You click a link in one app, and it takes you seamlessly to another. You log into Google from a completely new app, and it doesn’t ask for your password. You end up in some strange app, press the back button and you’re back in the previous app. This integration seems to go pretty deep, hinting at fathoms of API coverage. I really want to get into programming Android; I suspect the learning curve will be significant.

So in summary, another good OS to choose from.

Call me Android

I just bought my first mobile! I’ve had a couple of other pay-as-you-go mobiles for emergencies, but they rarely get switched on. This is a proper smartphone, with a real contract and no need to learn predictive texting (I bet successfully on never having to learn that horrible technology). This one has the benefit of being only £12 a month, and because Android can be used as a mobile wi-fi hotspot, I can use it with my iPad. I love it when you can kill several winged animals with a single projectile. Now, on with the hacking.